Mengapa Pilih Arkeologi UI...

Departemen Arkeologi FIB UI adalah lembaga yang mampu mengelola pengembangan ilmu dan SDM dalam bidang Ilmu Pengetahuan Budaya, khususnya Arkeologi yang diakui dunia Internasional. Sebagai pendidikan keilmuan Arkeologi terbaik di Indonesia. Departemen Arkeologi FIB UI (1) mengembangkan pendidikan dan penelitian ilmu pengetahuan budaya, khususnya arkeologi dalam rangka mengukuhkan jatidiri bangsa, (2) meningkatkan kemampuan sumber daya manusia yang andal dan terpercaya dalam hal pengabdian pada masyarakat di bidang Arkeologi dan (3) melaksanakan kerja sam dalam hal pendidikan, penelitian dan pengabdian pada masyarakat di bidang Arkeologi. Program Akademik yang ditawarkan adalah Program Studi Sarjana, Magister dan Doktoral.

Beasiswa Fieldschool Archaeology di Hawaii PDF Cetak

The Anthropology Department at the University of Hawai`i-Manoa is pleased to introduce the Luce Asian Archaeology Program (launched in July 2008), whose goal is to train junior professionals from East and Southeast Asia in Asian archaeology, history, art, and heritage management. This project is funded by The Henry Luce Foundation's Luce Initiative on East and Southeast Asian Archaeology and Early History and is additionally supported by participating entities within the University system. The first grant was awarded to Chan Sovichetra from Cambodia, who is currently immersed in Program activities here in Hawai`i.

GENERAL DESCRIPTION

The Anthropology Department at the University of Hawai`i-Manoa is pleased to introduce the Luce Asian Archaeology Program (launched in July 2008), whose goal is to train junior professionals from East and Southeast Asia in Asian archaeology, history, art, and heritage management. This project is funded by The Henry Luce Foundation's Luce Initiative on East and Southeast Asian Archaeology and Early History and is additionally supported by participating entities within the University system. The first grant was awarded to Chan Sovichetra from Cambodia, who is currently immersed in Program activities here in Hawai`i.

The Luce Asian Archaeological Project (hereafter LAAP) is co-directed by Dr. Miriam T. Stark (Professor) and Dr. Michael W. Graves (Professor Emeritus) at the University of Hawai`i at Manoa. LAAP is a non-degree program designed to meet three primary objectives: 1) enhance participants?Äô English language and professional skills to increase and enhance their involvement in the international world of archaeology; 2) provide in-class archaeological training to participants in a variety of subjects as professional development; and 3) provide archaeological field experience by including archaeological field training in Asia following the academic training at the University of Hawai`i at Manoa. In addition to the Department of Anthropology, other participating entities at UH-Manoa include the Center for Southeast Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies, American Studies, Art & Art History, Asian Studies, and History.

In general, eligibility includes citizenship in participating East and Southeast Asian countries and current employment in archaeology/heritage management fields at junior career stages, for example as a civil servant. Selection will be made on the basis of work-related and academic merit and potential. A limited number of fully funded fellowships as well as self-funded spaces are available each year. All inquiries should be directed to the Program in care of Dr. Nancy I. Cooper, Program Coordinator, E-mail ini dilindungi dari spam bots, kamu perlu mengaktifkan JavaScript utk melihatnya . We especially encourage junior-level East and Southeast Asian professionals who have obtained all their academic degrees within their own countries (rather than abroad) to apply for a Luce-funded slot in our Program by clicking on the 'applications' link in this webpage. (See below for detailed elegibility information.)

 COMPONENTS

Academic: The Program is designed to help junior-level archaeological professionals gain skills involved in international collaborative research and grant seeking. This involves on-campus training at the University of Hawai`i at Manoa which is administered through Outreach College, and which incorporates the NICE Program for English Language training. The Program of Studies as described in detail below includes English language instruction, coursework in archaeology and Asian archaeology, and class training as well as field experience.

East-West Center: LAAP participants will also be East-West Center Affiliates, mixing with other international students and participating in East-West Center activities. They will also be housed on campus at East-West Center.

Field Training: In the summer of 2009, Dr. Tianlong Jiao, Chair of Anthropology at Bishop Museum, will lead a five-week training component at two Neolithic sites in Zhejiang Province, China. In subsequent years, field training may be conducted in: (1) Hawai'i (North Kohala region, led by Dr. Michael Graves) that focuses on innovative approaches to remote sensing, survey, and mapping of archaeological features; (2) eastern Indonesia, led by Dr. Peter Lape; or (3) in Cambodia, led by Dr. Miriam T. Stark.

WHO IS ELIGIBLE FOR THIS PROGRAM?

Minimum Qualifications:

1. Asian Citizenship: Applicants must be citizens of an East or Southeast Asian country, with high priority given to low and lower income countries, including Peoples Republic of China, Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao PDR, Myanmar, Philippines, Thailand, Timor-Leste, and Vietnam.

2. Professional work experience: At least two years of full-time, post-baccalaureate work experience in archaeology or heritage management is required, with highest priority given to junior working professionals who have not received degrees outside of their own countries. Work in ancillary fields (like museums) will also be considered.

3. Bachelor's degree: Applicants must have a three or four-year undergraduate degree or its equivalent from a recognized institution in their home countries. See http://www.hawaii.edu/graduatestudies/international/html/international.htm for examples of possible equivalents that in any case will be determined by the Program.

4. English language competency: Sufficient English language competency to benefit from college-level courses is necessary. One of the following standardized tests is required (within the last five years) meeting the following minimum scores:

  • TOEFL - Test of English as a Foreign Language. A minimum composite score of 500/173/61 (Paper/Computer/Internet).
  • IELTS - International English Language Testing System. The academic (not general) overall band test result of 5.00.
  • TOEIC - Test of English for International Communication. Minimum is 600.

Notes:

  • No single attribute outweighs others in the selection process, but strengths in one area may offset weaknesses in another.
  • Regrettably, no accommodations can be made for dependents.
  • While the Anthropology Department at the University of Hawaii at Manoawarmly welcomes graduate students in a separate process, the LAAP is a full-time non-degree program.
  • Medical insurance (covered for Luce grantees) is required to attend the Program. Once selected, grantees will be given information on the Program provider and self-funded participants will be given a choice of providers.

HOW TO APPLY! (DEADLINE, JANUARY 15, 2009)

All applicants must submit the first seven items below either electronically or by post (no faxes). Electronic submissions should go to E-mail ini dilindungi dari spam bots, kamu perlu mengaktifkan JavaScript utk melihatnya , with signed documents in PDF format. Posted submissions should be sent to the Department of Anthropology, Luce Asian Archaeology Program, 2424 Maile Way, Saunders Hall 346, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA, 96822. Review of applications will begin January 15, 2009.

1. Application Form: The form (see below) must be completed, dated, and signed.

2. Official college/university transcripts: Official transcripts for all post-secondary schools attended must be sent directly by the school or Ministry of Education. Transcripts must include a list of courses taken, grades/marks received, number of hours spent in each class per term, and an explanation of the school's grading system. All documents must be in English or accompanied by an English translation certified by a school or Ministry of Education official.

3. Statement of Background and Purpose: In this one-page double-spaced essay, you should describe your professional accomplishments to date and how participation in this program will make you a more competent archaeological professional and help you to accomplish future professional or research goals.

4. Resume or Curriculum Vitae: In addition to your work experience and higher education, summarize the following in two pages maximum.
a) Scholarships, fellowships, grants or awards you have received, including academic, professional or community service recognition;
b) Positions of leadership that you currently hold or have held;
c) Publications you have authored or co-authored; and
d) Particular interests, experiences, skills and talents that may be relevant

5. Letter of Nomination from Home Institution: This one to two-page letter should be written and signed by an official of the institution you currently work for and printed on its official letterhead. The letter should include a statement of your qualifications, potential, motivation, and an assessment of how you will benefit from the program and contribute to your home institution, country, and the field of archaeology upon returning. If posted, the letter should be sealed and mailed directly from the institution to the address above and if electronically mailed should be in PDF format and sent in a separate transmission directly from the institution to E-mail ini dilindungi dari spam bots, kamu perlu mengaktifkan JavaScript utk melihatnya .

6. English Competency Test Scores: For 2008, official score reports of either the TOEFL, IELTS, or the TOEIC may either be posted or electronically issued.

7. Health Certification Form: This form must be completed, signed by a physician, and submitted with your application.

8. Optional Self-funding Instructions: Since Luce funding is available to only four participants each year, some applicants may wish to find their own funding. Those who wish to be considered as self-funded participants, in lieu of Luce funding, must check the appropriate box on the application form. In addition to all expenses, self-funded participants will have to pay an administrative fee and document that sufficient funds in U.S. dollars will be available for the duration of studies. The estimated cost of a year of study, including transportation is US $25,000. Self-funded applicants will be required to complete several additional forms with accompanying bank statements certifying financial support and signed within the previous six months. Instructions for the self-funding process will be made available to self-identified applicants after the review of applications. Self-funded participants must meet the same minimum requirements as participants receiving the limited Luce awards.

Review of applications begins on January 15, 2009, after all documents have been received, and notification of awards and admissions should be made within several weeks.

INFORMATION REGARDING VISAS:

  • Visa: An I-20 AB (the Certificate of Eligibility for Nonimmigrant F-1 Student Status) is sent to applicants after admission into the Luce Asian Archaeology Program and, in the case of self-funded applicants, satisfactory review of available funding for the duration of the approximately ten-month program in the US. (In some cases alternative types of visas may be sought.)
  • This I-20 AB will only be valid for participants intending to study full-time in the Luce Asian Archaeology Program at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Participants should present the I-20 AB and verification of funding (either Luce award or self-funding) to the nearest consulate/embassy for an F-1 visa. Complete instructions will accompany the 1-20 package sent to participants selected for the program. Participants will enter the U.S. under the F-1 visa.

OTHER COMPONENTS OF LAAP

New Faculty Positions in Chinese Archaeology: Dr. Tianlong Jiao under the auspices of the Luce grant, has joined the Anthropology Department as Assistant Professor on a part-time basis in order to offer courses in Chinese archaeology each Fall semester until Fall 2011. When not teaching, Dr. Jiao is Chair of Anthropology at Bishop Museum. Other collaborative opportunities at Bishop Museum may be offered to Program participants through Dr. Jiao?Äôs participation in LAAP. Dr Jiao will also lead a five-week training component at two Neolithic sites in Zhejiang Province, China.

New Tenure-track Faculty Position in Chinese Archaeology: We are pleased to welcome Dr. Christian Peterson as our incoming Luce hire. He was selected for the full-time position of Assistant Professor of Anthropology in East Asian archaeology, and is teaching 'Lithics Analysis in Archaeology' as a methods course this Fall 2008 semester.

International Archaeology Speaker Series: Each year, in conjunction with the University of Washington Southeast Asia Archaeological Research and Training Program directed by Dr. Peter Lape, two pro-seminars are planned for visiting Asian scholars who will speak on their recent research. These scholars will be individuals with active research profiles, international experience, and with work focused on south China or Southeast Asia.

Library Digitization and Acquisition Project: This project, with the support of The Asian Collection at Hamilton Library, will focus on building our library and web-based infrastructure in Asian archaeology.

Detailed Program of Studies: This year long archaeological Program beginning in July of 2008 provides full-time non-credit coursework for East and Southeast Asian participants, with priority given to applicants from low and lower income countries. An additional five-week field school in an Asian country follows the ten-month period in the U.S. at the University of Hawai`i at Manoa and possible Hawai`i fieldschool. Full funding for four participants each year (for three years) has been granted to the Program through the Anthropology Department at the University of Hawaii at Manoa by The Henry Luce Foundation's Luce Initiative on East and Southeast Asian Archaeology and Early History. Self-funded applicants will also be considered. Dr. Miriam T. Stark (Professor) and Dr. Michael W. Graves (Professor Emeritus) are the Program Co-directors and Dr. Nancy I. Cooper (Adjunct Associate Professor) is Program Coordinator for 2008 E-mail ini dilindungi dari spam bots, kamu perlu mengaktifkan JavaScript utk melihatnya .

Participants will be selected primarily on the basis of professional merit and potential from among the ranks of junior archaeology/heritage management professionals in need of additional academic, technical, and practical coursework that may not be available in their own countries. They will have affiliate status at East West Center where they will be housed. See "WHO IS ELIGIBILE FOR THIS PROGRAM" above, as well as "HOW TO APPLY" for complete information and instructions. Links to all forms are listed at the bottom of this webpage. Review of applications begins January 15, 2009.

Course content includes English language training, archaeology of Asia, prehistory and history of Asia, art and art history of Asia, and heritage management. Courses are categorized into five teaching domains, i.e., language skills, professional skills, technical skills, history or context, and theoretical issues. Each domain and course offering is described in more detail below. Each year, the intensive English language component begins in July (first cohort, July 11, 2008) followed by courses offered in Fall and Spring terms of the University of Hawai`i at Manoa regular academic year. Cooperating professors allow Program participants to join degree students in their regular classes, resulting in cross-cultural interactions that should benefit all. Spring Semester may be followed by field training for one additional week at an archaeological site in Hawai`i, followed by five weeks at a site in an Asian country to be designated on a year-by-year basis. Specifically tailored for the Program's participants, all courses are offered under the umbrella of Outreach College, through the N.I.C.E. English language program beginning with the 'Intensive Spoken English' component beginning in July of each year. English language instruction becomes less intensive throughout the year culminating with 'NICE at Night', as content courses become the focus of study. Assessment will be based on Student Learning Outcomes listed below. The Curriculum of Study <pdf> document charts the specific required courses by semester. Structured activities range from 18 to 20 hours per week, with classroom credit hour equivalencies equaling or exceeding 12 credit hours for a ten-month period prior to fieldwork.

Description of Teaching Domains

Language Skills (LS): Student Learning Outcome for the Intensive Spoken English component includes improvement in oral communication (including oral production, listening, and grammar) as well as in reading and writing. Student Learning Outcome for other components include competency in public speaking and academic writing.

Professional Skills (PS): Student Learning Outcome includes competency in research design development and proposal preparation and enhanced skills in public presentations.

Technical Skills (TS): Student Learning Outcome includes competency in basic archaeology laboratory and analytical techniques (including artifact analysis and Geographic Information Systems).

History or Context (HC): Student Learning Outcome includes increased background in prehistoric and early historic periods in regions of East and Southeast Asia.

Theoretical Issues: Student Learning Outcome includes intensive exposure to issues in current East and Southeast Asian archaeology from working professionals in the field.

 Description of Content Courses for academic year 2008/2009

Language courses incorporated into the Program are described separately on the NICE website under I.S.E. and NICE at Night. Curriculum for a given year will be drawn from the following courses offered at UH Manoa on a regular basis.

AMST 474/684, Historic Preservation, Museums and Collections, HC/TS (3) Participants may combine the halves of these two classes. American Studies 474 is the Historic Preservation component, including lectures and discussions on historic preservation issues in Hawai`i Asia, and the Pacific emphasizing indigenous and national expressions. American Studies 684 is the Museums and Collections component covering the work of museums and professionals (registrars, collections managers, conservators, curators and others) in the care of collections, interpretive studies of museum displays and collections, and fieldtrips.

AMST 684, Museums and Collections, TS (3) Offered through the Department of American Studies, this course covers the work of museums and professionals (registrars, collections managers, conservators, curators and others) in the care of collections, and includes interpretive studies of museum displays and collections and fieldtrips.

ANTH 321, World Archaeology I (Area), HC (3)This course is an in-depth introduction to the anthropological archaeology of human biological evolution and the development of early cultures. Topics include early fire use, stone tool technologies, foraging subsistence economies, early agriculture, and sociopolitical organization among small-scale societies.

ANTH 380, Archaeological Laboratory Methods, TS (3) This course covers the integration of laboratory techniques with problem-oriented archaeological research. Topics include: 1) the role of laboratory work in research design, 2) artifact analysis (of ceramics, lithics, and floral and faunal remains) and interpretation, and 3) the preparation of professional reports.

ANTH 462, East Asian Archaeology HC (3) This course features the prehistory and protohistory of China, Japan, and Korea from the earliest human occupation to historic times. Geographical emphasis may vary between China and Japan/Korea.

ANTH 695, Professional Skills Development in Anthropology, PS (3) Offered by the Anthropology Department, this graduate level seminar prepares students for entry into the profession of Anthropology, including employment opportunities, research, presentations, ethics, and outreach.

ART/HIST 385/321, Art of Early China and History of Japan, HC (3) This course combines the first half of Art 385 and the second half of History 321. The first half is a culturally oriented study of Chinese visual arts with emphasis on jade, bronze, secular and religious sculpture, and paintings in prehistory. The second half is a survey of culture, government, economics, and institutions to A.D. 1700.

HIST/ANTH 241/461, Civilizations and Archaeology of Asia, HC (3) This course combines the first half of History 241 (cross listed with ASAN 241) which is a historical survey of major civilizations of East and Southeast Asia from earliest times with the second half of Anthropology 461 which covers the prehistory and protohistory of Southeast Asia and of Southeast Asian contact with East Asia, India, Australia, and Oceania.

Visiting Scholar Program

Each year the Program plans to co-sponsor two proseminars given by visiting Asian scholars on recent research. These scholars will be individuals with active research profiles, international experience, and with work focused on south China or Southeast Asia. In addition to participation and responses by students, the seminars will provide opportunities for interaction with Asian colleagues and topics for discussion in other courses.

The course schedule for the first cohort, 2008/2009, can be viewed by clicking on the link at the bottom of this webpage.

 

USEFUL LINKS:

Application form (pdf)

Assumption of Risk and Release form (pdf)

Curriculum (pdf)

 
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Copyright© 2008 Departemen Arkeologi
Fakultas Ilmu Pengetahuan Budaya
Universitas Indonesia